CAROLINE LARSEN

 

Based in New York City, Caroline Larsen is known for using traditional oils with a less conventional application, piping bags. This unique process builds thick layers of carefully and methodically applied paint.

With vibrant, luscious works, Larsen has developed a following in the New York Art scene, and further afield, attending sought after residencies in Greece and accomplishing art fair representation across the globe.

With enthusiasm and passion, Larsen also enjoys creating art with a variety of mediums, which she has yet to combine with her intricate and impactful piping bag masterpieces. Through collaboration with alta, Larsen has discovered ways in which she can fuse and collage a variety of media, creating pieces that differentiate from her traditional body of work and tell their own story.

As an extension from her Flower Shop show, Larsen wanted to explore a new concept that incorporates her admiration for historical vases and her nostalgic love of kaleidoscopes. In 2019 The Hole, NYC featured her show Kaleidoscopic, in which “Art Deco and Rococo Revival-era vases present impossibly colorful and thick flower arrangements against optically scintillating backgrounds.”

Based in New York City, Caroline Larsen is known for using traditional oils with a less conventional application, piping bags. This unique process builds thick layers of carefully and methodically applied paint.

With vibrant, luscious works, Larsen has developed a following in the New York Art scene, and further afield, attending sought after residencies in Greece and accomplishing art fair representation across the globe.

With enthusiasm and passion, Larsen also enjoys creating art with a variety of mediums, which she has yet to combine with her intricate and impactful piping bag masterpieces. Through collaboration with alta, Larsen has discovered ways in which she can fuse and collage a variety of media, creating pieces that differentiate from her traditional body of work and tell their own story.

As an extension from her Flower Shop show, Larsen wanted to explore a new concept that incorporates her admiration for historical vases and her nostalgic love of kaleidoscopes. In 2019 The Hole, NYC featured her show Kaleidoscopic, in which “Art Deco and Rococo Revival-era vases present impossibly colorful and thick flower arrangements against optically scintillating backgrounds.”

 

 

 

“Insert Quote Here.”

Caroline Larsen – Artist, NYC

“Insert Quote Here.”

Caroline Larsen – Artist, NYC

 

 

Kaleidoscopic Colours

Widely admired for her celebration of colour, Larsen is recognized for her bold palettes of intricate piping, filling a piece from edge to edge.

Like the ever-morphing possibilities of a toy kaleidoscope, Larsen developed her Elegraph print series through three different colourways:

  1. “Vivid” a full rainbow of colour
  2. “Pastel” a softer iteration of the full rainbow palette
  3. “Primary” a transition to the pure primary colours: blue, red and yellow, plus black and white.

 

 

Kaleidoscopic Colours

Widely admired for her celebration of colour, Larsen is recognized for her bold palettes of intricate piping, filling a piece from edge to edge. Like the ever-morphing possibilities of a toy kaleidoscope, Larsen developed her Elegraph print series through three different colourways:

  1. “Vivid” a full rainbow of colour
  2. “Pastel” a softer iteration of the full rainbow palette
  3. “Primary” a transition to the pure primary colours: blue, red and yellow, plus black and white.

Such a playful use of colour makes for a bold impact, especially teamed with Larsen’s overflowing vases of beautifully impossible-colored tiger lilies, leopard spotted pansies, and neon edged leaves.

 

 

Digitally Collage

Digitize and Collage

alta digitized multiple sources from Larsen, including painting, beadwork, embroidery and photography – all of which are passions the artist, but don’t typically feature in her body of work.

Capturing data points as fine as 1/10th a human hair, we were able to replicate even the finest stitching details in embroidered patches and delicate beadwork. Under the direction of the artist, our team of art production specialists digitally embedded and augmented the various sources, swapping the design of Larsen’s vase to create a series of Elegraph prints.

 

Digitize and Collage

alta digitized multiple sources from Larsen, including painting, beadwork, embroidery and photography – all of which are passions the artist, but don’t typically feature in her body of work.

Capturing data points as fine as 1/10th a human hair, we were able to replicate even the finest stitching details in embroidered patches and delicate beadwork. Under the direction of the artist, our team of art production specialists digitally embedded and augmented the various sources, swapping the design of Larsen’s vase to create a series of Elegraph prints.

 

 

Iteration by Multiplication

Larsen’s vision roots one hand-piped work at the foundation of a whole series, with a simple concept to place the bouquet in a variety of vases, inspired by her Kaleidoscopic and Flower Shop shows that represents her fascination with Art Deco and Rococo Revival-era vases.

After selecting three color palettes for her kaleidoscopic background, Larsen created three variations for each series, each with a unique vase design. Utilizing our ability to digitally collage a variety of mediums and sources, Caroline Larsen’s final series consists of 9 unique iterations, which will yield editions of 9 prints per artwork.

Iteration by Multiplication

Larsen’s vision roots one hand-piped work at the foundation of a whole series, with a simple concept to place the bouquet in a variety of vases, inspired by her Kaleidoscopic and Flower Shop shows that represents her fascination with Art Deco and Rococo Revival-era vases.

After selecting three color palettes for her kaleidoscopic background, Larsen created three variations for each series, each with a unique vase design. Utilizing our ability to digitally collage a variety of mediums and sources, Caroline Larsen’s final series consists of 9 unique iterations, which will yield editions of 9 prints per artwork.